2016 Books Completed

  1. Mere Motherhood by Cindy Rollins
    +Having four small children it can be difficult to find time to read.  I read this book over our Christmas break and was able to finish it in three days.  I could not put the book down.  This book is a memoir of a homeschooling mother of 9 who implemented a Charlotte Mason/ Classical style of learning in her home.  She shares her journey of sanctification.  This made me laugh out loud and shed tears.  This book gives you GREAT perspective.  She now only has one child still in the home, so she is able to look back and remember what the things were that truly mattered.
  2.  Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte+This was a good and engaging novel.  I didn’t really get drawn in until about half way through.  Most of the novel proved to be very dark, but had a redeeming end.
  3. Teaching from Rest by Sarah Mckenzie
    + This book as well is a must read for homeschooling moms.  It is an 100 page book and an easy read.  It once again gives perspective.  The biggest idea I took away from this book is “Who’s well done are you working for?”  Most of the time in our homeschool’s if we are experiencing anxiety it is because we are trying to educate according to the world’s standard or some outside pressure is causing anxiety.  She again reminds us of what really matters as we go about our day with our children and that their biggest teacher will be the attitude we carry throughout out day.
  4. Consider This by Karren Glass
    + Karren Glass does a great job of showing how Charlotte Mason’s philosophy fits in the classical tradition.  I also really appreciated her thoughts about synthetic learning and the necessity of children being able to contextualize what they are learning.
  5. My Antonia by Willa Cather
    + This was my second classical novel of the year.  I definitely enjoyed this much more than Wuthering Heights and I will put this on my high school children’s reading list.  This book leaves you feeling very sentimental.  I hate to give away the ending, but it was truly what impacted me the most.  At the end you see Antonia, not with much money, an aged body, tired, and with  ten children; but still full of joy and life.  I comparison you see her friends who had chosen to chase their own dreams and carrier, but have lost a deep inner joy and peace.  I guess it spoke to me because you see that pouring out your life for others and in my case giving up your body and worldly riches for the sake of your husband and children, really can bring the deepest joy in life.
    The book also shows you how fast life really goes.  It mostly follows the friendship of a boy names Jim and  an immigrant Antonia from Bohemia.  It shows them with a pretty much care free life style, as children, on the prairies of Nebraska and follows their lives into adulthood.  This book also has a beautiful story of redemption for Antonia.  Ok I will stop rambling; READ the Book!
  6. The Latin Centered Curriculum by Andrew Campbell
    + This book probably needs a complete post of its own.  I was led to read this book because I have some questions about following a Charlotte Mason philosophy 100%.  I also really did desire to see the importance of latin in a curriculum.  Reading this book led me back to researching more about classical curriculum and had me think about some changes I may want to make next year.  It also is very simple.  If you want to give your kids a good classical education and are overwhelmed by all the you feel you “need” to teach.  Read this book.  It will truly help you simplify and re-evaluate the priorities of a classical education.

2017 Books

  1. The Attributes of God by A.W.Pink
    +If you want a higher view of God and a lower view of man, this is a great book.  Each of the  sixteen chapters is only about five pages, but has an enormous amount of depth.  I would read about one or two chapters a week and take a lot of time to meditate on what I read and copy what I have read.
    “Nothing will so enlarge the intellect, nothing so magnify the whole soul of man, as a devout, earnest, continued investigation of the great subject of the Deity.  The most excellent study for expanding the soul is the science of Christ and Him crucified and the knowledge of the Godhead in the glorious Trinity.”- Spurgeon
  2. Stepping Heavenward by Elizabeth Prentiss
    +  I had heard this book mentioned many times, but had never read it, I think mostly because I never saw it.  They had this book lying around at our church and I picked it up.  This book is a fictionally diary that follows a teenage girl into motherhood.  I am so thankful to have read this.  I think what I appreciated the most is that it acquaints you with suffering.  It takes place in the 1800’s.  In 21st century America most of us have suffered to some degree, but we are not as acquainted with suffering as those were in the 1800’s.  I gained a great perspective of suffering from this book and I know that if I was ever to face something very difficult I would go back to the is book to help refine my thoughts in the midst of suffering.  I loved watching how God uses all of life to sanctify one to look more like Christ.
  3. Leisure the Basis of Culture by Pieper
  4. Kristin Lavransdatter by Sigrid Undset
  5. Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell
  6. Organized Simplicity by Tsh Oxenreider (This was my 3rd time reading this book and won’t be my last, it takes you through creating a mission stating, evaluating how your spending your time and de-cluttering your house!)
  7. Essentialism : The Disciplined Pursuit of Less by Greg McKeown
    • This was a great book that I believe everyone could benefit from.  Although it was written mainly to the business world, I still found it very applicable as a stay at home mom.  It really helps you to discern what are the essential things in your life and what are you doing out of obligation or just because it may be a “good” opportunity.  If you are looking to do the things you are passionate about well, read this book!

Current Reads (these will probably take me through most of the year)

  1. The Liberal Arts Tradition by Kevin Clark and Ravi John Jain
  2. Eusebius the Church History
  3. City of God by Augustine- Abridged version, doing it along with Memoria Press Study Guide
  4. Nicholas and Alexandra by Robert Massie
  5. Liturgy of the Ordinary: Sacred Practices in Everyday Life by Tish Warren
  6. Beauty for Truth’s Sake: On the Re-enchantment of Education by Caldecott
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